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The University of Southampton
Engineering

Dr Rodney Self BSc, MSc, PhD

Professorial Fellow in Aeroacoustics

Dr Rodney Self's photo

Dr Rodney Self is a Professorial Fellow in Aeroacoustics within Engineering and Physical Sciences at the University of Southampton.

Career

Rod Self graduated with a first-class honours in Mathematical Physics and then joined the Royal Navy. After completing his commission he returned to academia and obtained an MSc followed by a PhD in Industrial Applied Mathematics at the Mathematics department of the University of Southampton. On completion he moved to the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research to take up a Research Fellow position. He is currently a Senior Lecturer.

Research & Roles

Rod Self’s research interests centre on aircraft noise. In particular he is interested in developing robust methods that can be used by industry to predict the noise produced by turbo-fan engine exhausts and other engine components. He also studies methods to predict noise around airports and how people who live nearby react to it.

Currently, Rod Self is the Deputy Director and Manager of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Noise where he leads the jet noise team and leads the UTC’s involvement in a number collaborative aircraft noise research projects with both UK and European partners. He has links with several Brazilian universities and is a partner in the Aeronave Silenciosa (Silent Aircraft) project.

Rod oversaw the development of the UTC’s Doak facility for testing jet and valve noise. He has sat on several technical and advisory committees including the recent ACARE (Advisory Council for Aviation Research and Innovation in Europe) working group defining the Flightpath 2050 targets for aircraft noise.

Research interests

Rod Self carries out research into how aircraft noise is produced, predicted and assessed. He is Deputy Director and Manager of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Gas Turbine Noise that undertakes research into all aspects of aircraft engine noise and he leads the UTC’s involvement in a number collaborative aircraft noise research projects with both UK and European partners. He is particularly interested in helping industry design quieter engines by developing robust methods that can be used to predict the noise from exhausts and other engine components. This involves a range of experimental, theoretical and computational studies.

Current work being undertaken focusses on developing a prediction methodology for the noise produced when exhaust jet flow mixes with the ambient air and how the noise varies depending on the design of the engine nozzle and how the engine is mounted under the wing of the aircraft. These studies involve experimental investigations at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research’s Doak Laboratory as well as theoretical studies.

Methods for predicting jet noise are also applicable to several other problems and one of these is in understanding how to design better silencers for valves. Aircraft engines have control valves known as bleed valves that, because of the high pressure differences involved, can be very noisy and designing silencers that are light and able to fit into small space available on engines is a difficult task. Undertaking a series of experiments on bleed valves within the Doak Laboratory allowed Rod and his team to develop methods that have led to considerable improvement in bleed valve silencers.
Rod Self also studies methods to predict noise around airports and how people who live nearby react to it.

(Courtesy Rolls-Royce)
Rolls-Royce Trent 900 turbo engine
design testing at the ISVR’s Doak Laboratory
Bleed valve silencer

Research Project - Novel Aircraft Noise

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Research group

Acoustics Group

Research project(s)

Why Do Wings Make Engines Noisier?

Prediction of Aircraft Exhaust Noise

The jet that emanates from a turbo-fan engine is a major contributor to aircraft noise. This project seeks to understand how such is produced and develop tools to predict it.

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Title Module Code Programme Role
Dynamics of Fluids II ISVR2005 Acoustical Engineering , Acoustics and Music Coordinator
Engineering Applications ISVR2024 Acoustical Engineering Lecturer
Dr Rodney Self
Engineering, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton. SO17 1BJ United Kingdom

Room Number: 13/2032

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