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The University of Southampton
Engineering

Research project: Improving the acquisition of Auditory Evoked Potentials for clinical diagnosis

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This research aims to improve acquisition of these responses and to assess and improve their diagnostic utility.

Auditory Evoked Potentials (AEPs) represent the electrical response of the brain to sound. They are used in the screening, diagnosis and habilitation of patients with hearing impairment. However they are very small signals, typically a millionth of a volt, embedded in high levels of noise, so they are difficult signals to measure reliability. This research aims to improve acquisition of these responses and to assess and improve their diagnostic utility. Several projects have investigated different aspects of acquiring AEPs under this research theme. Individual projects include : Using ‘transposed’ stimuli to improve the acquisition of Steady State AEPs. Measurement of binaural processing using AEPs (which has application to measuring development of the binaural hearing system). Estimating cochlear delay using AEPs. Improving the statistical detection of responses using bootstrap analysis methods and devising a paradigm for repeated statistical testing. Investigating the reliability of responses measured in free-field. Measuring AEPs to speech or natural sounds. Currently a doctoral in clinical practice student is investigating the reliability and diagnostic utility of cortical evoked potentials in young infants. Cortical responses have potential to assess speech perception and to evaluate hearing aid fittings in infants with hearing impairment.
Collaborations
Torsten Dau, James Harte, Gillis Pigasse Denmark Technical University

Related research groups

Human Sciences Group
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