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The University of Southampton
Engineering

Research project: Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: Statistical modelling for the assessment of surgical technique, implant performance and patient selection

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  Unicondylar Knee Arthroplasty (UKA), which resurfaces only the affected side of the knee joint, is an alternative to Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA). It is becoming increasingly popular because of its improved functional outcome, favourable long term clinical results and the benefits of minimally invasive surgical techniques. In particular, UKA offers a more effective solution than TKA for more active patients with single compartment knee disease, because the mechanics of the knee are better preserved, and more functional anatomy is maintained. UKA also has advantage of rapid rehabilitation, short hospital stay, quicker operation and quicker recovery. However, despite this, UKA is still under-exploited as an alternative to TKA. This is partly related to perception issues, and partly to historically higher failure rates due to improper technique. Therefore, it is desirable to improve the understanding of how surgical technique impacts UKA performance and failure risks, to inform clinical decision-making for UKA with best-practice surgical technique. In this EPSRC project, we will develop a clinical guide line for surgeons to explore the effect of altering specific variables within the surgical procedure on UKA performance.

The aim of this project is to provide a surgical reference and experimental assay of the varying of the position of UKA component, allowing surgeons to explore UKA in a virtual environment. By incorporating 3D positioning, patient-specific or statistically-generated anatomical geometry, and representative soft-tissue conditions, a clinical guide line will be developed for surgeons to explore the effect of altering specific within the surgical procedure on UKA performance.

Related research groups

Bioengineering Science
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