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Medicine

Dr N Kathleen Potter PhD

Tissue Bank Manager, Research Scientist

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Dr N Kathleen Potter is Tissue Bank Manager within the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton.

Dr. Potter was appointed the Faculty of Medicine Tissue Bank manager in 2009. The human Tissue Bank collects, stores and releases human tissue to ethically approved research studies. The Tissue Bank is licensed by the Human Tissue Authority (HTA) and is compliant with the regulations. Human tissue is either surplus to diagnosis or collected into specific studies. All tissues are stored with patient consent and released anonymously to the researchers. The Tissue Bank is a valuable resource for the study of a wide variety of cancers which can have an impact on understanding the molecular mechanisms of disease and the effective treatment for individual patients.

Dr. Potter is also involved with research into chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) through the analysis of immunoglobulin genes and signaling pathways is providing insights into the disease process. She completed her Ph.D. in Microbiology and Immunology in 1977 and has research experience in the fields of autoimmunity and cancer.

Qualifications

BSc, Biology, University of Montreal (1971)
MSc, Microbiology and Immunology, Queen’s University (1974)
PhD, Microbiology and Immunology, Queen’s University (1977)

Appointments held

Senior Research Fellow, University of Southampton , 1998-2009
Tissue Bank Manager, University of Southampton 2009-present

Research interests

Human Tissue Bank

Tissue that is surplus to diagnosis or for specific studies and corporate clients is collected and stored in the Tissue Bank. When manuscripts are published by researchers which include use of Tissue Bank support, the Tissue Bank is acknowledged as well as the funding from the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centre (ECMC) network.

Dr. Potter’s research has focused on Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL).
Several papers have been published which lead to a greater understanding the B cell isolated from these patients.

The paper published in Blood 2007 reports that the characteristics of CLL cells can be altered depending on their environment. This paper has been cited by the Faculty 1000 as a paper making a significant contribution to the field of CLL research.

The paper in Blood 115, January 2010 compares immunoglobulin genes from patients and healthy donors. The similarity helps determine the cell of origin in people with CLL.

A paper in Blood 115, May 2010 reports on the unexpected finding of high mannose carbohydrate on cell surface immunoglobulins of both CLL and activated normal B cells. The function of the sugar is not known.

A paper in Leukemia 2011 analyzed unusual sequences isolated from patient B cells with CLL. As the number of these sequences increases, correlations with clinical information will lead to understanding of their prognostic significance.

Department(s)

Cancer Sciences

University of Southampton

Member of Joint Quality Assurance Group

National and International responsibilities

. Invited speaker at international scientific meetings.
. Member of the Review Committee for the European Research Initiative on CLL (ERIC).
. On the Editorial Board for “International Scholarly Research Network Immunology”

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Articles

Delivers lectures on:

. B cell development
. Immunoglobulin structure and function
. The role of complement in bridging the innate and adaptive immune systems.
. M.Sc. allergy- The role of IgE antibodies in allergy

Facilitator in the “Basic Research Skills” module.

Dr N Kathleen Potter
Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Building 85, Life Sciences Building, Highfield Campus, Southampton, SO171BJ

Room Number: SGH/CSB3A/MP891

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