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Mr Bhavik Barochia

Mr Bhavik Barochia

 MBioSci FRMS MRSB

Research interests

  • Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) has been described by the World health Organisation (WHO) as the largest global challenges to face modern medicine. Bacterial Biofilms are a central to one of the key contributors to AMR. These are communities in which cells can confer increased tolerance to anti-microbial compounds and human immune cells. 
  • Bhavik's reserach interest is rooted in early drug discovery to combat AMR, with a focus on identification and characterisation of novel drug targets and development of biologically relevant models to investigate these biofilm infections.
  • Bhavik's PhD project focuses on the virulence factor LasB in P. aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis patients. This is of particular interest as it is a potential target for novel metalloprotease inhibitor compounds developed by the pharmaceutical company ANTABIO. The project has utilised genomic studies, protein structure modelling, molecular biology and biochemistry techniques, host-pathogen interaction modelling and advanced microscopy to investigate this as a protein target.

More research

Connect with Bhavik

Email: b.barochia@soton.ac.uk

Tel: +44 23 8059 4301

Address: B85, East Highfield Campus, University Road, SO17 1BJ (View in Google Maps)

Research

Research interests

  • Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) has been described by the World health Organisation (WHO) as the largest global challenges to face modern medicine. Bacterial Biofilms are a central to one of the key contributors to AMR. These are communities in which cells can confer increased tolerance to anti-microbial compounds and human immune cells. 
  • Bhavik's reserach interest is rooted in early drug discovery to combat AMR, with a focus on identification and characterisation of novel drug targets and development of biologically relevant models to investigate these biofilm infections.
  • Bhavik's PhD project focuses on the virulence factor LasB in P. aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis patients. This is of particular interest as it is a potential target for novel metalloprotease inhibitor compounds developed by the pharmaceutical company ANTABIO. The project has utilised genomic studies, protein structure modelling, molecular biology and biochemistry techniques, host-pathogen interaction modelling and advanced microscopy to investigate this as a protein target.
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