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Doctor Ivan Korotkin

Doctor Ivan Korotkin

Senior Research Assistant

Research interests

  • Lithium-ion batteries
  • Numerical methods
  • High-performance computing

More research

Connect with Ivan

Email: i.korotkin@soton.ac.uk

Tel: +44 23 8059 5141

Address: B54, West Highfield Campus, University Road, SO17 1BJ (View in Google Maps)

Research

Research groups

Research interests

  • Lithium-ion batteries
  • Numerical methods
  • High-performance computing
  • Research software engineering
  • Multiscale simulation

Current research

My current research at the University of Southampton is highly interdisciplinary and involves a combination of approaches from computational mathematics, numerical methods, computer science, physics, and chemistry. Specifically, I research physical and chemical mechanisms in battery cells and work on the development and implementation of high-performance code to solve physics-based mathematical models of lithium-ion batteries.

Our goal, which we have largely achieved, has been to create a robust and very fast computational framework which can be used to understand and optimise the physical, geometrical, and chemical characteristics of batteries. A portion of the working prototype of the code is available online at www.dandeliion.com.

A key property of our code (for which I am the main developer) that differentiates it from other similar software, is that the time taken to solve a problem scales linearly with increases in the numbers of unknowns up to extremely large systems. It is thus the only code that can solve a properly refined physics-based thermal-electrochemical model of multi-layered pouch and cylindrical cells, which, because of the multiscale nature of the model, leads to spatially pseudo-5-dimensional partial differential equations. The unique ability of DandeLiion to accurately solve these (hard) thermal-electrochemical problems allows manufacturers to prototype real cells in their working environment, i.e., this digital technology provides a virtual ‘digital twin’ of a real battery which can be used to significantly reduce prototyping costs.

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