Skip to main navigationSkip to main content
The University of Southampton
Chemistry

Research project: Denuault: Nanostructured microelectrodes

Currently Active: 
Yes

We have been investigating the amperometric properties of microdisc electrodes modified with nanoporous films.

Project Overview

These microelectrodes present the unique feature of having a large electroactive area (up to 1000 times greater than that of the bare electrode) while retaining the diffusional properties of conventional microdiscs. Such unique combination of properties is useful for redox processes involving an adsorption or absorption step. The modified electrode offers a huge number of active sites and its catalytic properties are significantly improved. E.g. the voltammetry of oxygen is markedly different on mesoporous microdiscs. Similarly, we found that the voltammetry of hydrogen peroxide is dramatically improved.

Click on image to enlarge
Click on image to enlarge

For more details see the following publications:

We have also studied the potentiometric properties of microdisc electrodes modified with nanostructured films. In the example below nanostructured Pd films deposited onto Pt microdisc electrodes are loaded with hydrogen to form a palladium hydride and used to measure pH potentiometrically. Thanks to the nanostructure these electrodes yield a very good potentiometric response with a level of quality (reproducibility, agreement with theory, stability, etc…) not found with conventional microelectrodes. We are using these electrodes as SECM tips for the localised detection of pH.

Click on image to enlarge
Click on image to enlarge

 

 

 

 

For more details see the following publications:

Recently we have applied this methodology to study pH changes during carbonation of lime:

Serrapede, et al., Nanostructured Pd Hydride Microelectrodes: In Situ Monitoring of pH Variations in a Porous Medium. Analytical Chemistry, 2014. 86(12): p. 5758-5765.

Related research groups

Electrochemistry

Staff

Share this research project Share this on Facebook Share this on Google+ Share this on Twitter Share this on Weibo

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×