The University of Southampton
Courses

LANG6018 Translation: Theory and Practice

Module Overview

Translation plays a major role in the exchange and circulation of practical information and culture production. This means that even if they do not enter the translation profession, in a society that is increasingly global, Modern Linguists are frequently called upon at some time to translate texts for formal or informal purposes in a variety of careers and voluntary capacity. This module will introduce you to a number of issues that need to be considered when undertaking translation between languages (interlingual translation).

Aims and Objectives

Module Aims

• introduce you to theoretical concepts relevant to practical translation • encourage you to evaluate and apply theoretical concepts to improve your own practical translation performance • raise your awareness of different types of texts (both written and oral) and approaches and strategies for translating them • develop your awareness of the skills required of a professional translator

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

Having successfully completed this module, you will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the types of difficulties encountered when translating texts aimed at the general public
  • the differences of style and convention in written forms between English and other languages in a variety of genres
  • the variety of reference materials and tools available to translators
  • aspects of translation theory and terminology relevant to practical translation
Transferable and Generic Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • present written work to a professional standard of presentation
  • communicate ideas and arguments orally and in writing
  • demonstrate interpersonal skills whilst working with others in the investigation of problems, and in the presentation of arguments and evidence
  • demonstrate self-confidence and self-awareness both in collaborative activities and independent study
  • work effectively to deadlines
Subject Specific Practical Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • provide competent translations of general texts
  • operate as a reliable translator in a semi-professional context
  • make effective use of written and online resources in translation
Subject Specific Intellectual and Research Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • recognise translation difficulties and evaluate alternatives for dealing with them
  • describe, analyse and explain the nature of translation difficulties both informally in discussion and formally in writing
  • refer to aspects of translation theory in evaluating strategies for dealing with certain types of text
  • recognise and handle different registers and genres in both the Source and Target Languages of texts for translation

Syllabus

Translation plays a major role in the exchange and circulation of practical information and culture production. This means that even if they do not enter the translation profession, in a society that is increasingly global, Modern Linguists are frequently called upon at some time to translate texts for formal or informal purposes in a variety of careers and voluntary capacity. This module will introduce you to a number of issues that need to be considered when undertaking translation between languages (interlingual translation). It will consider what is expected of a good translation and the on-going debate of how literal or free a translation should be. The module will cover text types, readership, purpose and cultural issues in translation. It will draw on modern linguistic theory to examine concepts such as equivalence (both at and above word level), compensation, and problems relating to the translation of register, sociolect and dialect. Lectures and guided reading will introduce you to theoretical issues, whilst seminars will focus on the analysis and translation of texts both in English and the language(s) you are studying. This will allow you to develop the skills for identifying problems and evaluating solutions with reference to theory and encourage you to apply the skills you will develop. In addition to analysing texts and producing your own translations, you will also have the opportunity to undertake translation criticism and editing and to evaluate published translations of texts in different genres.

Special Features

The module may be particularly useful if you are considering sitting Paper 1 of the Chartered Institute of Linguists Diploma in Translation examination after completing your studies.

Learning and Teaching

Teaching and learning methods

Teaching methods include • lectures and seminars. • whole class, small group and pair work activities • discussions arising from student-led activities • Blackboard as an interactive support • opportunity for one-to-one discussion with tutor(s) relating to an individual translation project Learning activities include • directed and undirected reading • text analysis • regular completion of translations, translation criticisms, translation comparisons and translation editing • accessing dictionaries and other reference tools, including online resources • participation in group and class discussion • researching and managing an individual translation project

TypeHours
Teaching24
Independent Study126
Total study time150

Resources & Reading list

Hervey, S. and Higgins, I. (2002). Thinking French Translation. 

Munday, J. (2016). Introducing Translation Studies, Theories and Applications. 

Hervey, S. Loughridge, M and Higgins, I. (2006). Thinking German Translation. 

Haywood, L., Thompson, M. and Hervey, S. (2009). Thinking Spanish Translation. 

Newmark, P. (1988). A Textbook of Translation. 

Baker, M and Saldana G. (eds) (2009). The Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies. 

Baker, M. (2011). In Other Words, A Coursebook on Translation. 

Assessment

Assessment Strategy

Assessments designed to provide informal, on-module feedback ? opportunities before each assessment for students to seek individual advice and guidance from the tutor(s) ? in-class guidance and advice on preparation, completion and presentation of un-assessed and assessed coursework ? in-class feedback on tasks prepared for class session Note that this module is available at both HE6 and HE7. To differentiate between the levels, there are different assessment patterns. The HE7 students are required to research and identify an appropriate text for the Text translation/analysis exercise, which is a more demanding task than working on a text provided by a tutor. HE7 students also undertake an Individual Translation Project which will require more research and in-depth reference to critical materials and a greater level of sophistication in the analysis.

Summative

MethodPercentage contribution
Translation exercise  (1000 words) 20%
Translation project  (3000 words) 80%

Referral

MethodPercentage contribution
Coursework %

Repeat Information

Repeat type: Internal & External

Costs

Costs associated with this module

Students are responsible for meeting the cost of essential textbooks, and of producing such essays, assignments, laboratory reports and dissertations as are required to fulfil the academic requirements for each programme of study.

In addition to this, students registered for this module typically also have to pay for:

Books and Stationery equipment

Copies of some of the texts on the Reading Lists will need to be purchased as the library currently holds them but newer editions have since appeared.

Please also ensure you read the section on additional costs in the University’s Fees, Charges and Expenses Regulations in the University Calendar available at www.calendar.soton.ac.uk.

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