The University of Southampton
Engineering and the Environment

Research project: Power modelling for cochlear implants

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Electrical power is required for a number of medical devices that are implanted in the head.

Project Overview

Electrical power is required for a number of medical devices that are implanted in the head. A feasibility study has been undertaken to estimate the maximum electrical power that could be harvested from the different axes of the linear and angular movements of a person’s head when walking. A tuned inertial device was assumed in each case, whose throw was limited by its size, and it was found that most power was generally available by harvesting from vertical head motion. The power available from the fundamental component by tuning the device to the walking frequency is predicted to be about 60 µW for a 1 cm3 device. Although more power is shown to be available from higher harmonics, this requires a lightly damped device that would respond significantly at only one walking speed. The higher harmonics also contribute to the power harvested by a heavily damped device, however, which is also able to respond to a range of walking speeds. The predicted power output for a 1 cm3 device is then about 80 µW.

Related research groups

Signal Processing and Control Group

Staff

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