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Research project: Absorbent products for urinary/faecal incontinence: a comparative evaluation of key product categories - Dormant - Dormant

Currently Active: 
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The cost of absorbent products to the health service is estimated to be around £69M per annum (Continence Foundation 2000) with demand pressures increasing as the population ages. The most common products used for both light and heavy incontinence are disposable inserts, yet there is evidence that other disposable categories may be more cost-effective (Cottenden et al 2001). Data from small studies suggests that reusuable products also have the potential to be more cost-effective than disposable products and product designs have improved substantially over the past few years. This project aims to compare performance and cost-effectiveness of the products in these key product categories.

Overview

Main question(s)

To compare the performance and cost-effectiveness of the key absorbent product categories for the containment of urinary and/or faecal incontinence in the following modules:

  • moderate/heavy incontinence - standard disposable inserts versus samples from the three main alternative disposable designs
  • moderate/heavy incontinence - standard disposable inserts versus samples from the two main categories of reusable designs
  • light incontinence - standard disposable inserts versus samples from the two main categories of reusable designs
  • to develop an instrument to measure Quality of Life (QoL) for people using absorbent producs

Methodology

Two centre, randomised cross-over design. Module 1 nursing home residents, modules 2-3 community dwelling adults. Subjects in each module will test each product for one week.

Main outcomes

The primary outcome variable will be leakage performance (determined by pad weight and leakage data). Secondary outcome measures determined by questionnaire data will include comfort, discreteness, ease of application, odour etc. Skin changes will be measured by a visual grading scale. Carer perspectives will be included in modules 1 and 2. Cost measurements will be addressed from both user and carer perspectives and will include direct costs (pad consumption, number of laundry items, labour time) and indirect costs. Development of a QoL scale.

Ongoing interests

Skin vulnerability and incontinence; patient care pathways for incontinence; womens' perception of incontinence needs and current services.

Project team

Mandy Fader, Kathryn Getliffe

Project funder

HTA

Related research groups

Active Living and Rehabilitation
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