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Research project: Patient perspectives in COPD: activities, social participation and pulmonary rehabilitation - Dormant - Dormant

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Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a chronic respiratory disease that gives rise to symptoms of breathlessness, chronic fatigue and cough. COPD can severely affect people’s ability to engage in activities. However, it appears that little has been published with regard to the experience of activity of people living with COPD. This project aimed to explore the activity needs of people living with COPD and the impact of pulmonary rehabilitation on this experience using qualitative methodology. Participants were recruited from both NHS services and self help groups. Interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed. Data were analysed to derive themes of importance to participants. The experience of activity centred on two main concepts: ‘stagnation’ related to confinement within the home and ‘movement’ which was associated with spending time outdoors. Following pulmonary rehabilitation participants experienced less fear associated with breathlessness and therefore felt more confident in managing their breathlessness and engaging in activities.

The symptoms of COPD (dyspnoea, cough and fatigue) can severely affect people’s ability to engage in activities. However, it appears that little has been published with regard to this experience of activity of people living with COPD. This project aimed to explore the activity needs of people living with COPD and the impact of pulmonary rehabilitation on this experience using Grounded Theory. Participants were recruited from both NHS services and self help groups using purposeful and theoretical sampling. Interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed. Data were analysed using constant comparative method and themes were identified using open, axial and selective coding strategies. The experience of activity centred on two main concepts: ‘stagnation’ related to confinement within the home and ‘movement’ which was associated with spending time outdoors. Following pulmonary rehabilitation participants experienced less fear associated with dyspnoea and therefore felt more confident in managing their dyspnoea and in engaging in activities.

Project team

Williams V, Bruton A, Ellis-Hill C, McPherson K

Project funder

Luxfer Gas Cylinders Ltd (2003-2007)

 

Associated research themes

Respiratory

Related research groups

Active Living and Rehabilitation
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