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Professor Peter Kazansky

Professor Peter Kazansky

Professor in Optoelectronics

Connect with Peter

Email: pgk@soton.ac.uk

Address: B46, West Highfield Campus, University Road, SO17 1BJ (View in Google Maps)

About

Peter G. Kazansky is a Professor in Optoelectronics Research Centre (ORC) at the University of Southampton leading a group in physical optoelectronics.

He received a M.Sc. degree in physics from Moscow State University in 1979 and a Ph.D. in physical electronics including quantum under supervision of Nobel Laureate for the invention of laser A.M. Prokhorov from the General Physics Institute (GPI) in 1985.

He was awarded the Lenin Komsomol Prize in 1989 for the pioneering work on "Circular photo-galvanic effect in crystals" (which concerns conversion of photon angular momentum to charge carrier momentum). From 1989 to 1993 he led a group in the GPI, unravelling the mystery of a new optical phenomenon - light-induced frequency doubling in media with inversion symmetry.  In 1992 he was awarded the title of Senior Research Fellow in "Physical Electronics".

In 1992 he joined the ORC, where he has been pursuing his interests in extraordinary optical phenomena, new materials and applications. In particular, periodically poled silica fibre technology pioneered in Southampton finally resulted in a world-first demonstration in collaboration with the University of Toronto and FORC at GPI of alignment-free, low-power diode-pumped, all-fibre polarization-entangled photon pair source.  He, in collaboration with the University of Kyoto, pioneered the field of avant-garde ultrafast laser writing and nano-structuring in glass leading to the invention of S-waveplate, a revolutionary geometric phase optical element, e.g.  for high-power polarization beam shaping  and “5D memory crystal,” which holds a Guinness world record for the most durable data storage medium. He served as a Vice-Chair of the Technical Committee on Glasses for Optoelectronics of the International Commission on Glass and is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America.

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