Skip to main navigationSkip to main content
The University of Southampton
Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute
Phone:
(023) 8059 7160
Email:
M.Ratoi@soton.ac.uk

Dr Monica Ratoi PhD

Lecturer in Lubrication Science

Dr Monica Ratoi's photo

Dr Monica Ratoi is Lecturer in Lubrication Science within Engineering and Physical Sciences at the University of Southampton.

Monica has received a first class BSc. Hons. Degree in Chemistry and Physics from the University Al. I. Cuza Iasi, Romania in 1992. She has started her doctoral studies in the Tribology Section of Imperial College London in 1992 and received a DIC (Diploma of Imperial College) in Tribology and a PhD from the University of London in 1996. For the next ten years she worked as a postdoctoral researcher in the Tribology Section of Imperial College London undertaking research and consultancy on a variety of high interest topics supplied by industrial sponsors. In 2006 Monica joined the Materials Department of the University of Oxford investigating the potential health and environmental risks associated with the engineered nanoparticles on the EC Nanosafe2 project. She has been providing expertise in nanotechnology, nanocoatings, nanomaterials and safety and risk related topics for projects and workshops of the European Parliament and European Governments. Monica joined nCATS as a Lecturer in Lubrication Science in May 2009.

Research interests

  • oil and water based lubricants
  • dry lubricants
  • liquid (emulsions) and solid colloids (engine soot and nanoparticles as EP additives)
  • surface chemistry, nanolayers and nanotexturing at tribological interface
  • characterization, detection and dispersion of nanoparticles
  • safety and risk of nanotechnologies

Research group

national Centre for Advanced Tribology at Southampton (nCATS)

Research project(s)

Particle analysis

Most hip and knee implants fail due to the effects of wear particles created by the implant.

Effects of vitamin E and natural lubricants on wear and oxidation of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)

Understanding the effects of natural lubricants in artificial joints to improve implants.

Polymer lubrication

This project investigates the tribological and wetting properties of a range of polymers with different polarities, hardnesses and roughnesses.

Nanoadditives for lubrication of hydrogen technology

Hydrogen fuel cells are currently being developed as an alternative to fossil fuels. However, hydrogen is a small atom and can permeate the surface of a material in high-pressure applications. Tribological components (e.g. bearings, valves, seals) subjected to a hydrogen atmosphere are affected by chemical changes of the substrate surface. A solution to this problem may be provided by the use of WS2 nanoparticles as additives in lubricants.This project was awarded a one year JSPS Short-term Fellowship (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) to facilitate collaboration with Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan. The project aims to investigate how the lubricant composition can mitigate the challenges posed by hydrogen environments.

WS2 as lubricant nanoadditives

Integration of nanoscale materials into complex systems has been enthusiastically driven over the last fifteen years by their wide range of potential benefits in many applications. In lubricants such as engine oils, transmission fluids, gears and bearing oils, nanoadditives have the potential to significantly reduce friction and wear of moving parts and enhance machine durability.

Nanoparticles characterization for nanotoxity

This study is proposing the use of enthalpy of wetting which depends on both specific surface area and surface properties, is easily measurable and proves to be highly relevant for predicting nanoparticles’ dispersion state and their interaction with the lungs.

Health implications of metal ions and particulates released from hip implants

The objective of the study is to provide fundamental chemical and physical data for dissolved and particulate metals that can then be used to aid in design of prostheses and surgical procedures that minimise potentially adverse health impacts from the breakdown of implants.

The impact of Friction Modifiers on ZDDP engine oil tribofilms

Friction modifiers and antiwear additives have been found to competitively react/adsorb on the rubbing ferrous substrates in a tribological contact.

Lubricant nanoadditives

Integration of nanoscale materials into complex systems has been enthusiastically driven over the last fifteen years by their wide range of potential benefits in many applications. In lubricants such as engine oils, transmission fluids, gears and bearing oils, nanoadditives have the potential to significantly reduce friction and wear of moving parts and enhance machine durability.

Sort via:TypeorYear

Articles

Book Chapter

Conferences

Dr Monica Ratoi
Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute University of Southampton Southampton Boldrewood Innovation Campus Southampton SO16 7QF

Room Number: 7/4037

Share this profile Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Weibo

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×