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The University of Southampton
Health Sciences

Dr Jane Prichard PhD Psychology

Senior Lecturer

Dr Jane Prichard's photo

Dr Jane Prichard is a Senior Lecturer within Health Sciences, University of Southampton and Programme Lead for BSc Healthcare: Management, Policy and Research. Jane's research interests focus on urgent and emergency healthcare provision with particular expertise in trust, teamwork, leadership, knowledge management and the use of new technologies in healthcare.

In an evolving healthcare landscape we are investigating the pivotal role of trust in facilitating effective change.

She was awarded her undergraduate degree and PhD in psychology by Southampton University in 2002 following a previous career as a management accountant.

She began her teaching career in the School of Social Sciences in Southampton where she contributed to the Applied Social Sciences Degree for 11 years. In 2012 she moved to Health Sciences to develop a new undergraduate programme in Healthcare: Management, policy and Research.

Research interests

Dr Jane Prichard is a psychologist with research interests in the area of team performance, trust, knowledge management and organisational change. She is currently involved on a major programme of research investigating the work, workforce, technology and organisation of integrated urgent and emergency healthcare services.

Research group

Health Work and Systems

Affiliate research group

Work Futures Research Centre

Research project(s)

A study of sense-making strategies and help-seeking behaviours associated with the use and provision of urgent care services

Urgent care reform has led to the development of multiple services (e.g. out-of-hours, walk-in centres, NHS 111) designed to improve access and manage rising service demand. Policy has sought to influence patient behaviour and choice of service in this complex urgent care landscape. Guiding patients to ‘get the right advice in the right place, first time', reducing unnecessary emergency department attendances by providing more responsive urgent care services, and providing better support for people to self-care has increasingly been the focus of national and local health policy. However, effective service provision requires a much deeper understanding of the factors that influence patients’ help-seeking and choices.

Jane is Programme Lead for the BSc (Hons) Healthcare: Management, Policy and Research

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Articles

Book Chapters

  • Ashleigh, M. J., & Prichard, J. S. (2011). Enhancing trust through training. In R. H. Searle, & D. Skinner (Eds.), Trust and Human Resource Management (pp. 125-138). Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Stanton, N. A., Connelly, V., Van Vugt, M., Prichard, J. S., Brennen, S., & Ives, C. (1999). Assessing the effects of location, media and task type on team performance. In D. Harris (Ed.), Engineering Psychology and Cognitive Ergonomics: Job design, product design and human-computer interaction (pp. 69-78). Aldershot, UK: Ashgate.
  • Stanton, N. A., Connelly, V., Van Vugt, M., Prichard, J. S., Brennen, S., & Ives, C. (1999). The effect of location on teamwork. In M. A. Hanson, E. J. Lovesey, & S. A. Robertson (Eds.), Contemporary Ergonomics 1999 (pp. 337-341). London: Taylor & Francis.

Conference

Reports

Jane has considerable experience in teaching across a range of topics in psychology including mental health, social psychology, group performance, the application of research to policy, dissertation supervision and research methods training.


Jane is also an experienced team development trainer working with other colleagues in the University to develop and run training programmes to MSc students, PhD students and Early Career Researchers.

In 2006 she was awarded the Vice Chancellors Teaching award for her work in the delivery of teaching for Applied Social Sciences.

Dr Jane Prichard
Health Sciences Student Office University of Southampton Highfield Southampton SO17 1BJ

Room Number: 67/3009

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