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The University of Southampton
Modern Languages and LinguisticsPart of Humanities
Phone:
(023) 8059 3403
Email:
L.Dominguez@soton.ac.uk

Dr Laura Domínguez PhD

Deputy Head of Department and Director of Research, Modern Languages and Linguistics

Dr Laura Domínguez's photo

Dr Laura Domínguez is the Deputy Head of Department and Director of Research, Modern Languages and Linguistics at the University of Southampton.

I joined the department in 2004, after receiving my PhD in Applied Linguistics from Boston University. My thesis analysed the prosodic and syntactic constraints of focus marking, and how these affect word order in Spanish. Most of my research since has focused on investigating how adult speakers of Spanish learn these language-specific constraints. A revised version of my thesis, which also includes L2 acquisition and L1 attrition data, was published by John Benjamins in 2013 (Domínguez, L. 2013. Understanding Interfaces: L2 acquisition and native language attrition of Spanish subject realization and word order variation. Amsterdam: John Bejamins).

My research on syntax, second language acquisition and first language attrition is framed within the generative (Minimalist) programme. I teach modules in linguistics, mainly Spanish morphosyntax, variation, research methodology, and first and second language acquisition.

Research

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Research interests

My research interests lie in the areas of language development (first and second language acquisition, bilingualism and language attrition), and syntactic theory (syntax and the interfaces, information structure, Romance syntax and Hispanic linguistics), both within a generative framework.

My research has mainly centred on the analysis of information structure and focus, in particular how word order in Spanish is affected by both prosodic and syntactic constraints. I have conducted extensive research on the L2 acquisition and attrition of Spanish word order and subject pronouns by advanced English speakers.

I am also interested in the acquisition of Spanish tense and aspect morphology, and how English learners of Spanish figure out that Spanish marks the imperfective/perfective distinction with specific verbal morphology, unlike English.

I am the co-director of the ESRC-funded SPLLOC project (www.splloc.soton.ac.uk) which investigates the acquisition of Spanish morphosyntax by English learners. SPLLOC is the first corpus of learner oral data completely open-access and freely available to the research and teaching communities. 

I am a co-investigator in the following research projects:

- PI: Monika Schmid (Essex). International Network Grant on First Language Attrition. Funding agency: ESRC. 2015-2017.

- PI: Amaya Mendikoetxea (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid). “Interfaces and variability in native and developing grammars: theoretical and methodological approaches”. Funding agency: MINECO (Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad), Spain. 2013-2016.

- PI: Amaya Mendikoetxea (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid). “Optionality and pseudo-Optionality in native and non-native grammars”.

Member of the editorial board of ‘Studies in Second Language Acquisition’ and the ‘Journal of the European Second Language Association’.

Member of the ‘European Second Language Association’ (EuroSLA) Executive Committee.

Member of the ‘ESRC Peer Review College’.

Associate Member of the Centre for Applied Research and Outreach in Language Education (CAROLE). University of Greenwich, UK.

Associate Member of the Centre for Literacy and Multilingualism (CeLM). University of Reading, UK.

Linguistics Association of Great Britain (LAGB) (ordinary member).

Recent research projects

SPLLOC 1 (April 2006-March 2008)

Linguistic development in L2 Spanish: creation and analysis of a learner corpus (SPLLOC)
Funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), the project had two broad aims: to establish a small scale, high quality database of spoken learner Spanish (ages 14-21), and to undertake a short programme of substantive research into L2 Spanish, including the acquisition of word order and clitic pronouns as interface phenomena.

L1 Attrition (June 2007-May 2008)

"Losing your tongue: first language attrition in monolingual and bilingual settings" funded by the British Academy.
This project explores in what ways immigrant bilingual speakers who have spent over 25 years abroad modify their first language (including their vocabulary and key syntactic structures) influenced by the new linguistic environment. Two different groups of subjects participate in this study: Cuban exiles who have settled in Miami and still use Spanish as the dominant language, and Spaniards who moved to the UK and have replaced their Spanish with English almost entirely. By comparing these two different groups the role that L1 and L2 input has on the linguistic competence of those who move abroad will be analysed.

Research project(s)

The Emergence and Development of the Tense-Aspect System in L2 Spanish (SPLLOC 2) - Dormant

This project has further developed the SPLLOC (Spanish Learner Language Oral Corpora) research programme and has included new data investigating the acquisition of tense and aspect by English learners of Spanish.

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Pre-publication

Domínguez, L. (Forthcoming). An interface account of Spanish word order: structure, acquisition and attrition. Manuscript under contract.

Articles

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Postgraduate supervision

I would like to hear from applicants interested in syntactic development in first and second language acquisition with a special interest in Spanish or any other Romance language.

Dr Laura Domínguez
Building 65 Faculty of Arts and Humanities University of Southampton Avenue Campus Highfield Southampton SO17 1BF United Kingdom

Room Number: 65/3057

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