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Professor Neil Gregor

Professor Neil Gregor

Professor of Modern European History

Research interests

  • His first book, Daimler-Benz in the Third Reich (Yale University Press, 1998), examined the ways in which a major German corporation adapted to the demands of the Third Reich and became complicit in its racial crimes as a result; it was shortlisted for the Longman/History Today Book Prize and shared the Fraenkel Prize for Contemporary History in 1997.  His second major monograph, Haunted City: Nuremberg and the Nazi Past (Yale University Press, 2008) marked an attempt to explore the unstable dynamics of post-1945 memory cultures against the background of the social history of the post-war years; it also shared the Fraenkel Prize for Contemporary History for that year.
  • Whilst working on the post-war years he has maintained an active interest in the study of the Third Reich, editing a collection on the historiography of Nazism, publishing a short study of Hitler's writings, and, editing a Festschrift for Jeremy Noakes; he has co-edited, with my colleagues Mark Roseman (Indiana) and Nils Roemer (Texas) a volume of essays on the comparative study of minorities in German history.

More research

Email: n.gregor@soton.ac.uk

Address: B65, Avenue Campus, Highfield Road, SO17 1BF

Research

Research groups

Research interests

  • His first book, Daimler-Benz in the Third Reich (Yale University Press, 1998), examined the ways in which a major German corporation adapted to the demands of the Third Reich and became complicit in its racial crimes as a result; it was shortlisted for the Longman/History Today Book Prize and shared the Fraenkel Prize for Contemporary History in 1997.  His second major monograph, Haunted City: Nuremberg and the Nazi Past (Yale University Press, 2008) marked an attempt to explore the unstable dynamics of post-1945 memory cultures against the background of the social history of the post-war years; it also shared the Fraenkel Prize for Contemporary History for that year.
  • Whilst working on the post-war years he has maintained an active interest in the study of the Third Reich, editing a collection on the historiography of Nazism, publishing a short study of Hitler's writings, and, editing a Festschrift for Jeremy Noakes; he has co-edited, with my colleagues Mark Roseman (Indiana) and Nils Roemer (Texas) a volume of essays on the comparative study of minorities in German history.

Research projects

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