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The University of Southampton
Medicine
Email:
R.J.Salib@soton.ac.uk

Mr Rami Salib BMedSci, BM, BS, DLO, FRCSI (Oto), FRCS (CSiG with Oto), PhD, FRCS (ORL-HNS)

HEFCE Associate Professor in Rhinology & Honorary Consultant Otorhinolaryngologist

Mr Rami Salib's photo
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Rami Salib is an Associate Professor of Rhinology & Consultant Ear, Nose & Throat Surgeon within the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Southampton. Mr Salib's research is primarily focused on the nose and sinuses, and he is the founder and director of the Upper Airway Research Group at the University of Southampton. Mr Salib's current research is focused on chronic rhinosinusitis, a common and chronic condition, with the aim of improving understanding of the causes of this condition, and developing novel treatments to reduce reliance on antibiotics and requirement for operations. As a clinician, Mr Salib treats many medical and surgical disorders of the ear, nose and throat with subspecialist interest in nose and sinus disorders.

It is vital in our quest to tackle the global public health challenge of antimicrobial resistance, that we continue to develop novel strategies to replace or minimise antibiotic use

Mr Salib was appointed as a HEFCE Senior Lecturer in Rhinology in 2009. Having graduated in medicine from the University of Nottingham, he trained in general surgery then specialised in ENT. He completed his PhD in Southampton University 2005 working on mast cell chemotaxis in allergic rhinitis with a particular focus on transforming growth factor-beta.

Mr Salib’s current research is centred on chronic rhinisinusitis, a chronic and debilitating disease, with focus on use of novel molecular techniques (such as T-RFLP) to characterise microbial diversity, and development of novel biofilm-targeted therapies for this condition. His research is based within the Faculty of Medicine campus. Potential students, post-doctoral scientists or clinician scientists who are interested in joining Mr Salib’s group are encouraged to contact him.

Mr Salib is also an Honorary ENT Consultant at Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust. 

Qualifications

B Med Sci, Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Nottingham (1992)
BM BS, University of Nottingham (1994)
DLO, Royal College of Surgeons of England (1998)
FRCSI (Oto), Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland (1998)
FRCS (CSiG with Oto), Royal College of Surgeons of England (1999)
PhD, University of Southampton (2005)
FRCS (ORL-HNS), Royal College of Surgeons of England (2006)

Appointments held

Specialist Registrar in ORL-HNS on Wessex Training Rotation 2004-2009.

Royal College of Surgeons of England Clinical Research Felllow, University of Southampton 2001-2004

Research interests

Use of novel culture-independent molecular techniques to characterise microbial diversity in chronic rhinosinusitis

Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with or without polyps, is a common chronic upper airway disorder with significant socio-economic impact. Despite research efforts into both the medical and surgical management of this condition, there remains a sub-set of patients who exhibit symptoms refractory to established treatments. The ability to characterise accurately the cause of infection in CRS is fundamental to effective treatment. Traditional culture-based diagnostic microbiology, associated with fundamental drawbacks, is in many cases unable to provide this information. Molecular microbiological approaches that assess the content of clinical samples in a culture-independent manner promise to revolutionise the range and quality of data that are obtained routinely from clinical samples.

In collaboration with Dr Ken Bruce’s team at King’s College London, Mr Salib is investigating the use of novel culture-independent molecular techniques to characterise the microbial diversity in chronic rhinosinusitis. The aim is to validate the use of the technique Terminal restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiling in sino-nasal tissue samples for the first time and utilise it to characterise bacterial/fungal content within the upper airway in the CRS setting. Mr Salib aims to translate the results of this research into better-targeted antimicrobial therapy for CRS sufferers, particularly those with resistant disease.

Biofilms in chronic rhinosinusitis

Emerging evidence increasingly implicates microbial biofilms as mediators of the inflammatory process in CRS, however, research characterizing the nature and role of biofilms in the pathogenic process is lacking and there are conflicting reports outlining specific pathogens associated with CRS.

Mr Salib’s research aims to characterise biofilms in CRS with the aim of developing diagnostic platforms and novel biofilm-targeted therapies with the ultimate aim of improving surical outcomes and reducing recurrence rates.

The role of fungal antigens in the pathophysiology of nasal polyps in chronic rhinosinusitis

A fascinating and very controversial area in rhinosinusitis involves the role of fungi in the aetiology of the disease and induction of chronicity. It has been suggested that fungi are the real drivers of the chronic inflammatory reaction in rhinosiusitis, although this is not a view accepted universally. Mr Salib is investigating the effect of fungal allergens on nasal explant tissue from CRS sufferers with particular emphasis on the remodelling process which is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps. This is novel work and the results will have important implications in improving our understanding of fungal involvement in the disease process in CRS. This will help in the development of better-targeted treatments in the future for those patients with medically and surgically recalcitrant CRS.

Anyone interested in graduate studentships, or post-doctoral positions (non-clinical and clinical) in Mr Salib’s group are encouraged to contact him directly.

Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with or without polyps
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)
Emerging evidence increasingly implicates microbial biofilms as mediators of the inflammatory process in CRS
Biofilms in chronic rhinosinusitis
The role of fungal antigens in the pathophysiology of nasal polyps in chronic rhinosinusitis
The role of fungal antigens

Department(s)

Clinical and Experimental Sciences

Affiliate Department(s)

Infection and Immunity Research group

Undergraduate student supervision

2010 Samuel Chan (BM4)

Postgraduate student supervision

Current

Charlotte Wade (MSc)
Christos Merkonidis (MSc)
Steve Hayes (ENT Clinical Research Fellow – MD/PhD)

University of Southampton

Director of Airways Disease module for MSc Allergy course

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Articles

Conference

  • Lau, L. C. K., Lwaleed, B. A., Cooper, A., Salib, R. J., Voegeli, D., Kambara, T., ... Walls, A. F. (2011). Inhibition of mast cell mediator release in the presence of honey. Poster session presented at International Mast Cell and Basophil meeting: European Mast Cell and Basophil Research Network and European Cooperation in Science and Technology, Southampton, United Kingdom.

Letter/Editorial

Review

Teaching faculty member on the internationally renowned Wessex Advanced Endoscopic Sinus Surgery Course held annually in Winchester. 

Teaching faculty member for the Birmingham-Bristol-Southampton FRCS(ORL-HNS) Part III revision course

Teaching faculty member for Southampon Undergraduate Medical Students

Teaching on GP ENT refresher courses

Mr Rami Salib
Academic Unit of Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Mailpoint 810, Sir Henry Wellcome Laboratories, Faculty of Medicine, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.
Tel - 02380 825635. Fax - 02380 825688.
Email - R.J.Salib@soton.ac.uk

Email:R.J.Salib@soton.ac.uk

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