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The Parkes Institute

Prizes

The Moss Prizes

In 2007, an endowment was made to create student prizes for work in the area of Jewish history and culture at the University of Southampton. The Moss Prizes are in memory of Stephen Moss, a former student of the University, and his mother, Daphne. These generous annual prizes are for the best undergraduate essay and the best postgraduate essay. Each year subsequently we have been able to award these prizes for truly outstanding student work. The prizes are presented at the annual Parkes Lecture. We are deeply indebted to the Moss family and to the Society of Women's Writers and Journalists for their continued support of these prizes.

A full list of previous recipients is available below.

Picture of Liz Moss and Tony Kushner
Liz Moss and Tony Kushner in 2007

2016-17

Undergraduate
Adam Groves, ' "The Capital of Mediterranean Cool": Tel Aviv and Israel’s Mediterranean Identity in the Twenty-First Century'
Postgraduate
Nicola Woodhead, 'An analysis of the educational provisions relating to the Kindertransport from the National Archives and Holocaust Memorial Day Trust'

2015-16

Undergraduate
David Ainsworth, ‘What was the effect of unification on German-Jewish identities?’
Postgraduate
Katarzyna Dziekan, ‘How and to what extent did Jacob Frank challenge the prevailing political framework of Jewish and Sabbatian communities in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth?’
Jacqueline Hughes, ‘How did German Jews immigrating to Palestine in the 1930s encounter their new homeland?’

2014-15

Undergraduate
Sadie Banyard, 'Were the organisations set up and actions taken by the established Anglo-Jewish community to deal with immigrants concerned with social control or were they motivated by altruism?'
Postgraduate
Katie Power, ‘How true to the original text was the 1925 GOSET interpretation of Isaac L. Peretz’s Bay Nakht Afn Altn Mark (At Night in the Old Marketplace)?'

2013-14

Undergraduate
Hannah Corkerry, ‘How would you explain the scarcity of Jewish armed resistance in the ghettos?’
Postgraduate
Will Chivers, ‘Trauma, Resistance and Resettlement in Jewish Humour: a lens through which to view the Jewish experience in the diaspora?'

2011-12

Undergraduate
Katherine Webb, 'The Roman Annexation of Egypt in 30BCE and the Treatment of the Jews'
Postgraduate
Rebecca White, 'Vladimir Jabotinksy's The Five, a Discourse on Odessa'

2010-11

Undergraduate
Katherine Parker, 'To what extent can I. G. Farben as a company be said to be complicit in the Final Solution; was it simply a crime amongst individuals?'
Postgraduate
Alexandra Cunningham, 'Assimilation and the Anglo-Jewish woman: The relationship between Jewish women and the emancipation and assimilation of Anglo Jewry 1835-1914'

2009-10

Undergraduate
Matthew Rabagliati, 'Has Israel become a Third Space?'
Postgraduate
Laura Shattock, 'Music in The Pianist (2002): Assessing the Effectiveness and Authenticity of Polanski’s use of Chopin for the Film’s Soundtrack'

2008-09

Undergraduate
Rhys Griffiths, ‘ “There is nothing in this world as invisible as a monument”: The Art of Post-Holocaust Remembrance in Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything is Illuminated'
Postgraduate
Sarah Shawyer, 'Comparative Analysis of Two Testimonies from The Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies'

2007-08

Undergraduate
Alex Jones, 'Unravelling Threads: Contextualising the Women of the Hebrew Bible, and their Impact'
Postgraduate
Lucy Gaughan, 'Exile-as-Tourism in the (re) construction of a Postmodern Jewish identity: A Discussion on Howard Jacobson’s Roots Schmoots: Journeys Among Jews'

2006-07

Undergraduate
Tom Sharrad, 'Representations of London’s East End Through Literature: Israel Zangwill’s Children of The Ghetto & Monica Ali’s Brick Lane'
(Tom Sharrad's essay also won the BAJS prize the same year)
Postgraduate
Hannah Ewence, 'The Impact of Immigration on the Jewish Male'
Diana Piopescu, 'A literary transition from “longing” to “belonging”, confronting “the motherland”: the changing perceptions of the land of Israel'

The British Association for Jewish Studies

The British Association for Jewish Studies (BAJS) was founded in 1975 as a learned society and professional organization on a non-profit-making basis. Its aims are to nurture, cultivate and advance teaching and research in Jewish culture and history in all its aspects within Higher Education in the British Isles. There is an Annual BAJS Student Essay Prize. Two prizes are available, one for an undergraduate essay and one for a postgraduate essay. Further information can be found on the BAJS webpage.

Logo of BAJS
British Association for Jewish Studies

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