The University of Southampton
Biological Sciences
Phone:
(023) 8059 5998
Email:
M.Vargas-Caballero@soton.ac.uk

Dr Mariana Vargas-Caballero 

Research Career Track Lecturer, Institute for Life Sciences, Principal Investigator (Neuroscience),International BioSci Student Tutor

Dr Mariana Vargas-Caballero's photo
Related links
Personal homepage

Dr Mariana Vargas-Caballero is Research Career Track Lecturer for the Institute for Life Sciences, located within Biological Sciences at the University of Southampton.

Career history

2012-present: Research Career Track Lecturer. Institute for Life Sciences, University of Southampton, UK.

Academic qualifications

2005: PhD Neuroscience. Department of Physiology, University of Cambridge, UK.
2001: MPhil Biological Sciences. Department of Physiology, University of Cambridge, UK.
1999: BSc. Biology. Honours. Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico (UAEM), Mexico.

Fellowship awards

2008-2012: Ion Channels and Disease Initiative (OXION) Training Fellowship. Wellcome Trust, University of Oxford, UK. 
2004-2007: International Research Fellowship. Wellcome Trust, UK.

Teaching

2015: Postgraduate certificate in Academic Practice. University of Southampton.

Research

Publications

Teaching

Contributions

Contact

Research interests

The Vargas-Caballero laboratory focuses on studying the synaptic mechanisms of memory and how these are affected in memory loss. Our main aim is to understand how memories become disrupted in Alzheimer’s disease. Although studies of Alzheimer's disease have greatly increased in the last few decades, there is currently still no effective therapy that can stop disease progression. Our current knowledge suggests that this disease initially impacts on synapse integrity in the brain: the mechanisms, however, are not well understood. We use electrophysiological experiments and behavioural and molecular analyses to link synaptic function and plasticity in experimental models of Alzheimer's disease.

Research

Emergence of synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. We are using mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease to understand the synaptic modifications that correlate with the emergence of cognitive impairment, and we are investigating whether pharmacological intervention can rescue synapses and memory deficits, early on in the disease.

How does amyloid beta affect synaptic function. Translating knowledge from mouse to human neurons. We are collaborating with various laboratories to establish whether the mechanisms by which amyloid beta affects neurons in mice are also present in human neurons to focus on therapeutic intervention.

We thank the following funding bodies for supporting our current work:
Alzheimer’s Research UK
Alzheimer’s Society
Gerald Kerkut Trust
Wessex Medical Research
Rose Trees Trust
CONACyT

PhD Supervision

Sarmi Sri, Emergence of cognitive impairment in an Alzheimer's Disease mouse model. Funded by Alzheimer’s Research UK with support from the Institute for Life Sciences and Biological Sciences.
Chrysia-Maria Pegasiou, Translating knowledge from mouse to human: How does amyloid beta affect synaptic function? Funded by the Kerkut Trust and the Institute for Life Sciences.

Research group

Biomedical Sciences

Affiliate research groups

Institute for Life Sciences, Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, Southampton Neuroscience Group

Research project(s)

Investigating the interface between metabolism and neurodegeneration

This project seeks to combine electrophysiological and oxygen flux detection techniques to examine alterations in metabolism and synaptic functioning in health and disease.

Modulation of Alzheimer's disease protein networks: Minimising neuronal toxicity while preserving synaptic plasticity

Unravelling the role of microtubule stabilisation in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease

Microtubule destabilisation is believed to be a key mechanism by which phosphorylated tau causes dysfunction in tauopathies. In Alzheimer’s disease Abeta peptide toxicity is mediated by phosphorylated tau. This PhD project investigates whether microtubule destabilisation underpins this tau-Abeta interaction.

An integrated approach to CNS inflammation: cooperation between antibodies and CD8 T cells

Microtubule destabilisation is believed to be a key mechanism by which phosphorylated tau causes dysfunction in tauopathies. In Alzheimer’s disease Abeta peptide toxicity is mediated by phosphorylated tau. This PhD project investigates whether microtubule destabilisation underpins this tau-Abeta interaction.

Articles

Review

Book Chapter

Lecturer

BIOL2014 Neuroscience

BIOL3018 Molecular Pharmacology

BIOL3020 Systems Neuroscience

BIOL3048 Neurodegenerative Diseases

BIOL6034 Systems Neuroscience

BIOL6045 Neurodegenerative Disease

 

University of Southampton

International Biological Sciences Student Tutor

Professional memberships

Institute for Life Sciences
Southampton Neuroscience Research Group

 

Outreach

The Vargas-Caballero group can deliver a presentation/workshop on Synapses, Memory and Alzheimer’s disease. If you would like this talk/workshop delivered in your school or group, book via Ask the Expert, University of Southampton.

 

Dr Mariana Vargas-Caballero
Biological Sciences
Faculty of Natural & Environmental Sciences
Life Sciences Building 85
University of Southampton
Highfield Campus
Southampton
SO17 1BJ

Room Number:85/3041

Telephone:(023) 8059 5998
Email:M.Vargas-Caballero@soton.ac.uk


Dr Mariana Vargas-Caballero's personal home page
Share this profile Facebook Google+ Twitter Weibo

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×