The University of Southampton
Health Sciences
Phone:
(023) 8059 8927
Email:
C.D.Metcalf@soton.ac.uk

Dr Cheryl D Metcalf PhD, MSc, BA (Hons)

Principal Enterprise Fellow

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Dr Metcalf is a Principal Enterprise Fellow in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Southampton and a Visiting Research Fellow in the Faculty of Physical & Applied Science at the University. She also held a prestigious Research Council's (UK) Roberts' Fellowship in Life Sciences Interface. Much of her work is at the interface between engineering and health. She works specifically on the evaluation and validation of health technologies. She is particularly interested in technologies that measure movement and function, and developing novel methods of capturing this information.

I believe that in order to facilitate the next generation of healthcare provision, health technologies must be capable of capturing and presenting clinically useful, personalised information to rehabilitationalists, patients and carers in environments that go beyond the traditional rehabilitation clinic.

I am a Lecturer in Biomechanics and an Enterprise Fellow in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Southampton and a Visiting Research Fellow in the Faculty of Physical & Applied Science at the University. I also held a prestigious Research Council's (UK) Roberts' Fellowship in Life Sciences Interface. Much of my research is working at the interface between engineering and rehabilitation.

During my PhD in the Faculty of Physical & Applied Sciences, I investigated the relationship between movement and function of the wrist and hand. I focused on investigating the differences in wrist movements and hand function between unimpaired and chronic stroke participants.

I completed my Masters degree in Evolutionary & Adaptive Systems at the University of Sussex in 2003 and my Undergraduate degree in Computer Studies at the University of Sunderland.

 

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Research interests

The intricacies of functional hand movements is very difficult to capture and accurately measure. Subtle variations in movements, in order to optimise function have compounded the complexity of our ability to measure, arguably one of the most complex evolutionary development, in humans. The human hand is the optimal functional tool; tasks which are seemingly impossible for even our most advanced robots are accomplished by a functional hand.

I developed HAWK; a comprehensive kinematic measurement technique has been developed to measure all the degrees of freedom of the wrist, hand, fingers and thumb. This technique has been validated for accuracy and reliability, and has been applied in many different interdisciplinary projects in order to further our understanding of the strategies of movement adopted in various aspects of hand function.

“I work specifically on the evaluation and validation of health technologies. I am particularly interested in technologies that measure movement and function, and developing novel methods of capturing this information. I believe that in order to facilitate the next generation of healthcare provision, health technologies must be capable of capturing and presenting clinically useful, personalised information to both rehabilitationalists, patients and carers in environments that go beyond the traditional rehabilitation clinic.

I specialise in the kinematic and biomechanical assessment of hand function and I hold a patent in this field. I also work on projects investigating the use of smart textiles for rehabilitation, body sensor networks for patient monitoring in their home environments and health technology evaluation and assessment, including the use of prosthetics and orthotics.

If you are interested in knowing more about the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP), including hiring or buying kits for your own research, clinical practice or company, please take a look at the new SHAP website www.shap.ecs.soton.ac.uk.

Videos of my hand biomechanics research, plus other exciting work from our Biomechanics Laboratory can be viewed here: https://www.youtube.com/user/UniSotonBiomech. ”

Research group

Active Living and Rehabilitation

Affiliate research group

Electronic & Electrical Engineering

Research project(s)

Instrumented Stump Sock for Measuring Pressure at the Stump/Sock Interface

This project was funded by the Ministry of Defense and the aim was to investigate the pressure at the sock/stump interface. In addition to interface pressure, we also measured 3D motion, EMG and a number of standardised functional outcome measurements for the lower limb. A major outcome of this project was a systematic review of the factors associated with prosthetic prescription in transtibial and transfemoral amputees.

Development of a smart Armeo - Dormant

In this project we are developing a robotic device for hand opening and grasping to be used in conjunction with a commercial upper limb robot – the Armeo spring

Effectiveness of silver ring splints in rheumatoid arthritis - Dormant

This project reviewed the immediate effectiveness of custom made small finger silver ring splints for people with hand rheumatoid arthritis in preventing hyperextension when conducting functional movement.

Clinical and bioengineering investigation into the predictors & effectiveness of proximal interphalangeal joint surgery for patient with hand arthritis

This research aims to systematically review the available evidence using a standardised review tool to assess and report the immediate and long term functional effectiveness of PIPJ arthoplasty.

Iterative User-Centred Design of a Paediatric Upper Limb Prosthetic Device

The objective of this project was to investigate the views of the child with regard to their prostheses and to provide an insight into the potential improvements that could be made to existing designs to make them more acceptable to children.

Hand opening to grasp ‘virtual’ objects during reaching tasks in a rehabilitation robot: a proof of concept study

The objective of this project was to the effect of rehabilitation robotic therapy on upper limb function when recovering from stroke.

Faculty Enterprise Fellow

Board Member (Biomedical Engineering): Doctoral Training Centre for the Institute for Complex Systems Simulation

University Industry Sector Team: Health & Pharma board member

Faculty of Health Sciences Ethics Committee member

Current PhD supervision

Lyndsey Goulston (PhD in Assessment of Risk Factors in Developing Knee Osteoarthritis)

Ben Jenkins (PhD - Winchester School of Art)

Marlene Rosa (PhD in Co-contraction in Hemiplegic Gait: University of Aveiro, Portugal)

Daniel Halford (PhD - Hands–on Sound: Tracking Technologies in Music for Live Electronics)

Raquel Sparemberfer (PhD – Kinect and Arm Rehabilitation)

Articles

Conferences

Teaching:

HMPR1003 Introduction to quantitative methods: Evidence for Answers

HLTH6030 Sensory Motor Interaction

NURS6104 Open Module Mentor

 

Dr Cheryl D Metcalf
Faculty of Health Sciences Student Office University of Southampton Highfield Southampton SO17 1BJ

Room Number:45/0029

Telephone:(023) 8059 8927
Email:C.D.Metcalf@soton.ac.uk


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