The University of Southampton
Courses

MUSI1009 Introduction to Ethnomusicology

Module Overview

This unit will introduce you to ethnomusicology and the ways ethnomusicologists have approached distinct musics. Please note, that this is not a ‘world music’ survey course however (focusing on gamelan, ragas etc). Instead, several case studies from around the globe will be explored over the semester each will develop understandings of music in a specific social context. Types of issues that may be explored include: ontologies of music, music and the environment, music and agriculture, genre, power and colonialism, difference, race, and gender, globalisation, the World Music phenomenon, commercialisation, and notions of tradition and authenticity. The module will be based on the study of books and articles, and close listening and viewing of audio-visual materials.

Aims and Objectives

Module Aims

examine a range of musics from different social contexts ? introduce students to ethnomusicology and ethnomusicological approaches to studying musics ? consider polemics arising from the ‘world music’ phenomenon

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding

Having successfully completed this module, you will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the musics covered in this module
  • the relationship of these musics to their social context
  • the polemics arising from the ‘world music’ phenomenon
Subject Specific Practical Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • associate musics with their larger social contexts
  • describe musics in terms relevant to the context concerned
  • listen analytically to a variety of musics.
Subject Specific Intellectual and Research Skills

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • differentiate between different musical styles covered in this module
  • identify basic musical elements and instruments in the musics covered in this module
Learning Outcomes

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of the relationship of musical practices to their social context.

Syllabus

Several case studies from around the globe will be explored over the semester each will develop understandings of music in a specific social context. Examples of questions that may be explored include: How do potatoes, cycles of production and agriculture make music meaningful in the Andes? How have indigenous ideas about creativity and community contributed to Bolivian digital music production? Why are birds and the rainforest soundscape so key to understanding music-making in Papua New Guinea? To what extent has the world music phenomenon empowered musicians?

Learning and Teaching

Teaching and learning methods

Teaching methods include ? Lectures ? Discussion ? Sharing of ideas and materials via Blackboard and other electronic resources Learning activities include ? A range of readings ? Study of audio and video recordings ? Use of online resources

TypeHours
Preparation for scheduled sessions24
Follow-up work42
Lecture24
Completion of assessment task60
Total study time150

Resources & Reading list

Nettl, Bruno (2005). The Study of Ethnomusicology: Twenty-Nine Issues and Concepts. 

Bohlman, Philip V. (2002). World Music: A Very Short Introduction. 

Rice, Timothy (2013). Ethnomusicology: A Very Short Introduction. 

Stobart, Henry (2006). Music and the Poetics of Production in the Bolivian Andes. 

Assessment

Assessment Strategy

Include details of the proportion and weighting of coursework as well as the number, type and duration of examination(s) Informal assessment ? Feedback during discussions ? Tutorial assistance in tutor’s open hours

Summative

MethodPercentage contribution
Essay  (2000 words) 65%
Essay  (1000 words) 35%

Repeat Information

Repeat type: Internal & External

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