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Courses

PAIR6051 International Migration and Development

Module Overview

The analytical focus of this course is on the nexus between international migration and development. It fist addresses the theoretical and historical overview of such nexus. Over the following sessions, it moves to a critical discussion of selected topics such as the regulation of diverse forms of mobility in border zones; the impact of individual and collective strategies to development; the increasing importance of urban spaces as catalysts for displacements, exchanges, and innovation, and the implications of the feminization of migrant flows for socio-economic and human development.

Aims and Objectives

Module Aims

This course aims at providing students with theoretical and policy-oriented knowledge of the links and tensions between international migration and development. It addresses the complexities of development processes that involve movement of people and related mobilities from a global political economy perspective, building upon interdisciplinary literature to engage with topical issues that in practice cut across the local, national, regional and global levels of analysis. Going beyond old dichotomies and a single geographical focus, the readings illustrate various degrees of asymmetries and development gaps within and across countries in all regions of the world. Following a historical and theoretical overview, the course encourages critical discussion of selected topics such as the regulation of diverse forms of mobility in border zones; the impact of individual and collective strategies to development; the increasing importance of urban spaces as catalysts for displacements, exchanges, and innovation, and the implications of the feminization of migrant flows for socio-economic and human development.

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Aanalyse and apply the main theories and concepts concerning international migration and development
  • Critically evaluate related debates
  • Engage with ongoing discussions about political aspects of human mobility
  • Build on case studies across regions to assess policy alternatives

Syllabus

1. Introduction to the course: expectations, requirements, and organizational plans. Conceptual framework. 2. The nexus between migration and development a. Historical overview b. Theoretical perspectives 3. From global lo local dilemmas policy dilemmas a. The development gap reconsidered: development by whom, and for whom? b. The regulation of diverse forms of mobility across national and regional spaces 4. Development strategies and human mobility: rationale and results a. Changing gears at the international level: from foreign-aid to co-development b. Long-distance nationalism and national development 5. Migrants’ agency revisited a. Branding ethnicity b. Migration-induced crises as policy tools 6. Zooming the lenses on border zones a. The impact of legal and illegal forms of transit b. The negotiation of wealth, well-being, and identities 7. The debate on economic and social remittances. Part I. a. Channeling financial flows b. Capturing knowledge flows 8. The debate on economic and social remittances. Part II. a. Migrants’ social and cultural capital as triggers of innovation b. Do democratic practices and institutions travel with migrants? 9. Migrant entrepreneurship: implications for the global political economy a. The internationalization of food and ethnic cuisine b. Niche markets: migrants as producers and consumers 10. The transformation of urban spaces through migration a. The emergence of global cities b. Local politics meet migrant festivities/art in the street 11. The political economy of female & family international migration. a. Dismembered households and transnational care chains b. Marriage migration, invisible workers, and informal migrant networks 12. Conclusions

Learning and Teaching

Teaching and learning methods

This class is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars. Postgraduate students are expected to lead some seminar discussions.

TypeHours
Independent Study126
Teaching24
Total study time150

Resources & Reading list

Sample of required readings. • Faist, Thomas, Margit Fauser and Peter Kivisto (eds.) 2011. The Migration-Development Nexus: A Transnational Perspective. London: Palgrave Macmillan. • Gould, W.T.S. 2015. Population and Development. New York: Routledge. Chapter 6. • Phillips, Nicola (ed.) 2011. Migration in the Global Political Economy. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner. • Nunn, Nathan, and Nancy Qian. 2010. “The Columbian Exchange: A History of Disease, Food, and Ideas.” The Journal of Economic Perspectives 24 (2): 163–88. • Delgado-Wise, Raúl et al. 2015. “Ten Myths about Migration and Development: Revelations Involving the Mexico-United States Experience.” In Global Migration: Old Assymptions, New Dynamics, ed. by Diego Acosta Arcarazo and Anja Wiesbrock. Santa Barbara: Praeger. • Glick Schiller, Nina and Thomas Faist (eds.) 2010. Migration, Development and Transnationalization: A Critical Stance. New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books. • Comaroff, John L. and Jean Comaroff. 2009. Ethnicity, Inc. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago University. • Bank Muñoz, Carolina. 2009. Transnational Tortillas: Race, Gender, and Shop-Floor Politics in Mexico and the United States. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. • Baldassar, Loretta and Laura Merla (eds.) 2013. Transnational Families, Migration and the Circulation of Care. Oxford, UK: Routledge.

Assessment

Summative

MethodPercentage contribution
Class discussions 20%
Exam 40%
Group project 40%

Referral

MethodPercentage contribution
Exam 100%

Repeat Information

Repeat type: Internal & External

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