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PAIR6033 Globalisation, Governance and Diasporas

Module Overview

This main goal of this course is to introduce students to the study of transnational migration from an international relations perspective. The course draws on literature from the field as well as other social sciences and, particularly, on studies that emphasize the political processes involved in the movement of people across countries and regions of the world.

Aims and Objectives

Module Aims

The main goal of this module is to introduce students to the study of transnational migration from an international relations perspective. The course draws on literature from the field as well as other social sciences and, particularly, on studies that emphasize the political processes involvement in the movement of people across countries and regions of the world.

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Critical understanding of main theories and current debates addressed in the module
  • Engagement with current inter-disciplinary discussions on human mobility
  • Building on case studies across regions to assess policy alternatives to pressing migration issues

Syllabus

The course first addresses historical trends, conceptual and theoretical issues, and the specific contributions of transnational studies to the understanding of international migration. Detailed consideration is given to a growing body of literature that emphasizes the importance of local contexts and urban settings in which the impact of migrants as agents of socio-cultural, economic, and political change can be observed. The discussion then moves to a critical examination of how the notions of sovereignty, territory, citizenship, and belonging are being redefined under globalization and regional integration policies and the dilemmas that nation-states face today at the local, national, and regional levels in connection with the movement of people. Novel approaches to conceptualize diaspora politics within international relations and foreign policy are examined, as well as the impact of state-diaspora relations on economic development, modernization, and democratization. Selected case studies drawing on current migration experiences in the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia are used to illustrate broader conceptual issues in each week.

Learning and Teaching

Teaching and learning methods

This module is taught through a weekly two-hour seminar involving group discussion based on prior reading and questions pre-circulated by students as well as lecturer-initiated and student-led presentations. The assessment methods are designed to support effectively this process.

TypeHours
Independent Study200
Total study time200

Resources & Reading list

indicative list of required readings. â€¢ Cohen, Robin. 2008. Global Diasporas. An Introduction. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. Second Edition. • Martin, Susan. 2015. “International Migration and Global Governance.” Global Summitry. Advanced access published 28 May. DOI: 10.1093/global/guv001. • Vertovec, Steven. 2009. Transnationalism. London and New York: Routledge. • Betts, Alexander. ed. 2011. Global Migration Governance. Oxford: Oxford University Press. • Castles, Stephen. 2004. “Why migration policies fail?” Ethnic and Racial Studies. 27 (2): 205-227. • Messina, Anthony M. and Gallya Lahav (eds.) 2006. The Migration Reader. Exploring Politics and Policies. Boulder and London: Lynne Rienner Publishers. • Kapur, Devesh. 2010. Diaspora, Development, and Democracy. The Domestic Impact of International Migration from India. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press. Ch. 1. • Shain, Yossi and Aharon Barth. 2003. “Diasporas and International Relations Theory.” International Organization. 57: 449-479. • Pécoud, Antoine. 2015. Depoliticising Migration. Global Governance and International Migration Narratives. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Assessment

Summative

MethodPercentage contribution
Book review  (1500 words) 30%
Discussion 20%
Literature review  (3000 words) 40%
Presentation 10%
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