Skip to main navigationSkip to main content
The University of Southampton
Courses

CRIM3015 Youth and Crime

Module Overview

The youth of today' has long been a source of curiosity to older generations, and sociologists and criminologists are no exception to this trend. Over the past 100 years, there have been attempts both to explain society's fascination with the younger generation, and to delineate young people's experiences within a theoretical framework. Young people have always been discussed as troublesome, or in trouble, and this module takes this as its main theme. However, youthful crime and indiscretion cannot be divorced from the transition from youth to adulthood. Therefore, we will also spend some time on the more general sociological issues that have arisen in the field of the sociology of youth. Of course, the sub-discipline's subject matter is something we all know about from our own experience: indeed, most if not all of you taking this unit would be considered prime targets for contemporary sociologists of youth! This module is designed to introduce you to some of the central themes and concepts in the sociology of youth and criminological concerns with youth crime, and to some of the key substantive concerns of contemporary youth researchers. With regard to the former, we will explore the social construction of youth and youth crime, dominant discourses surrounding the study of youth, subcultural approaches to youth, the youth transitions tradition, and more recent approaches drawing on theories of reflexive modernisation, which have explored the nature and extent of processes of detraditionalisation and individualisation in young people’s lives. Along the way, we will touch upon the following substantive topics: youth subcultures, youth cultures in the context of globalisation, the youth labour market and what the impact is on young people excluded from it, household formation, the youth justice system, social exclusion and civic engagement, the rise of individualised lifestyles, debates concerning gender convergence, ‘post-feminism’, the purported ‘crisis in masculinity’ and broader generational change. Where possible, the course will shed further light on these themes by taking a cross-cultural perspective, with examples both from the UK and from a variety of international contexts, including a final session on young people in post-socialist Eastern Europe.

Aims and Objectives

Learning Outcomes

Syllabus

This module will introduce you to some of the central themes and concepts in the sociology of youth and the criminological concern with youth crime, and to some of the key substantive concerns of contemporary youth researchers. With regard to the former, we will explore the social construction of youth and youth crime, dominant discourses surrounding the study of youth, subcultural approaches to youth and crime, the youth transitions tradition, and more recent approaches drawing on Beck's individualisation thesis. With regard to the latter, we will examine the following substantive topics: youth cultures, youth crime, the youth labour market, household formation, the youth justice system, social exclusion and civic engagement, the rise of individualised lifestyles, and debates concerning gender convergence, ‘post-feminism’, and broader generational change. A key theme underpinning the unit as a whole relates to contemporary debates about the changing nature of 'youth' and 'young adulthood' in the early twenty first century.

Learning and Teaching

Teaching and learning methods

This module is taught by means of ten weekly two hour sessions in which students will be expected to engage in a range of learning activities. Learning activities include: • small group work • classroom discussion • student presentations • data interpretation exercises

TypeHours
Teaching14
Independent Study136
Total study time150

Resources & Reading list

France, A. Understanding Youth in Late Modernity . 

Furlong, A and Cartmel, F (2007). Young People and Social Change: New Perspectives . 

Muncie, J. (2014). Youth and Crime. 

Nayak, A and Kehily, M  (2008). Gender, Youth and Culture: Young Masculinities and Femininities . 

Assessment

Summative

MethodPercentage contribution
Critical Reflection  (500 words) 20%
Essay  (2000 words) 80%

Referral

MethodPercentage contribution
Essay  (2500 words) 100%

Repeat Information

Repeat type: Internal & External

Costs

Costs associated with this module

Students are responsible for meeting the cost of essential textbooks, and of producing such essays, assignments, laboratory reports and dissertations as are required to fulfil the academic requirements for each programme of study.

In addition to this, students registered for this module typically also have to pay for:

Books and Stationery equipment

Recommended texts for this module may be available in limited supply in the University Library and students may wish to purchase reading texts as appropriate.

Please also ensure you read the section on additional costs in the University’s Fees, Charges and Expenses Regulations in the University Calendar available at www.calendar.soton.ac.uk.

Share this module Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter Share this on Weibo
Privacy Settings