The University of Southampton
Courses

DEMO2013 Population History

Module Overview

After successfully completing this module you should be able to: (1) describe the course of population change over the last 1,000 years or so in England; (2) describe how fertility, mortality and migration have contributed to population change over the same period; (3) describe the major sources of data about the English population in the past, and their strengths and weaknesses; (4) use some of the more straightforward data sources to analyse population change; (5) describe the major explanations of population change which have been put forward in the literature, and, where there are competing explanations, describe their differences; (6) evaluate these explanations by confronting them with empirical evidence; (7) explain how population changes are related to other social and economic changes at both a national and a local level; (8) write essays about population history.

Aims and Objectives

Module Aims

(1) To introduce you to the characteristics of historical population change in England, comparing England to different parts of the world; (2) to enable you to describe and evaluate the major debates in population history; (3) to introduce you to the main historical sources which have been used to analyse population history, with reference in particular to the case of England.

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

Having successfully completed this module you will be able to:

  • Describe the course of population change over the last 1,000 years in England.
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how to use and interpret historical documents
  • Allocate tasks to members of a group so that your objectives are attained as efficiently as possible.
  • Describe how fertility, mortality and migration have contributed to population change over the same period.
  • Describe the major sources of data about the English population in the past, and their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Use some of the more straightforward data sources to analyse population change
  • Describe the major explanations of population change which have been put forward in the literature, and, where there are competing explanations, describe their differences.
  • Evaluate these explanations by confronting them with empirical evidence.
  • Explain how population changes are related to other social and economic changes at both a national and a local level.
  • Write essays about population history.
  • Read critically the results of previous research.

Syllabus

Sex and death: an introduction to population history Domesday England Population change between 1086 and 1400 Sources of data for the population of medieval England: Domesday Book and the fourteenth century Poll Taxes The Black Death and its consequences ‘Pokkes, pestilences and fowl yviles’: the population of England in the fifteenth century Misery or prudence? Population change in England between 1540 and 1750 War, famine and disease in early modern England Marriage and family life in England between 1540 and 1750 The Church of England parish registers and other early modern sources Sex and fertility in early modern England Migration in sixteenth and seventeenth century England Population growth after 1750 Civil registration and the nineteenth century censuses The decline of mortality before 1850: a demographic detective story Nature and nurture: the decline of mortality after 1850 The decline of fertility Migration in and from nineteenth century England The population of England between the two World Wars Lessons from the past: why population history is important How to pass the examination without inordinate effort

Special Features

No special features other than the field trip (described above).

Learning and Teaching

Teaching and learning methods

Teaching will be via lectures, seminars/field trip and independent study. This will entail 22 tutor-led lectures, tutorials and discussions, and two field trips to the Hampshire Record Office in Winchester and to Wiltshire. Learning activities will include learning in lectures, presenting and discussing issues during seminars, and a group exercise. The majority of students with special needs can be accommodated on the field trip as the venue is accessible for those in wheelchairs.

TypeHours
Teaching28
Independent Study122
Total study time150

Resources & Reading list

Other. Access to text books, journal articles, web sites and other sources of related information. A small financial contribution for the field trip will be required, but this can be met from within the Divisional budget.

Hinde, A. (2003). England’s population: a history since the Domesday Survey. 

Assessment

Summative

MethodPercentage contribution
Coursework assignment(s)  (2000 words) 33%
Exam  (2 hours) 67%

Referral

MethodPercentage contribution
Exam 100%

Repeat Information

Repeat type: Internal & External

Share this module Facebook Google+ Twitter Weibo

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×